Smart contesters and DXpeditioners use a feature of logging software called ‘Super Check Partial’ (SCP). The even smarter ones use this in conjunction with ‘SCP+1’, or ‘N+1’ as it is sometimes called.

This is applicable to all modes of operating.

In Win-Test is is called ‘Check Partial’;  In N1MM+ it is called ‘Check Log’.

(Note: Dom M0BLF has an excellent intro to Win-Test on YouTube which includes a demo of Check Partial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLO16kqrg5w)

What is SCP ?

Super Check Partial is a database of call-signs available from http://www.supercheckpartial.com/ (and many thanks to Stu-K6TU for providing this service !).

As the site describes: The Super Check Partial database files provide a list of call-signs used by active contesters. The data comes from Cabrillo logs contributed by contesters themselves. Contributed logs from the past 24 months are used to create the database. These logs are combined and filtered so that they result in a fairly good (but not perfect) list. The files do not contain any QSO data, such as state, CQ zone, Maidenhead Grid Locator, etc.

How does SCP help ?

 Golden Rule – If the call-sign you are logging does NOT appear in the Check Partial (SCP) window then DOUBLE CHECK IT by listening carefully or ask him to confirm the call!!!

Often, you’ll be operating on a DXpedition or contest and you’ll have difficulty copying the other guy’s call-sign. This is where SCP helps! As you enter a call-sign into the logging line, any matching call-signs from the SCP data-base will appear in the SCP window. So, if you are missing a letter (or maybe more) or not quite sure about it , the SCP is a great prompt – it offers very likely suggestions for that missing letter(s).

What is SCP+1 (N+1) ?

SCP+1 is similar to SCP except that it also checks calls that are up to one letter different to the one entered in the logging line. This is also a very powerful feature.

Risks in using SCP.

If you totally rely on the SCP window to prompt the received call-sign, you are running the risk that it might be incorrect – it is merely a ‘very good guess’. So, be warned!

Using SCP and N+1 in Win-Test.

Download the File

To use the feature in Win-Test, first make sure the latest SCP file is downloaded from Stu’s site. It is called ‘master.scp’ and needs to be copied into the /databases directory. You can find this directory  under the WT menu: Tools | Explore | /databases directory (see below).

databases directory
databases directory

Selecting the ‘/databases directory’ option will take you to Windoes Explorer – copy the latest downloaded master.scp file into it.

In-Flight Use

Once in WT it is import to have the Check Partials and N+1 windows open. These need to be selected in the menu from the ‘Windows’ option:

Windows menu - Check Partial & N plus 1
Windows menu – Check Partial & N plus 1

Note that ‘Check Partial’ and ‘N+1’ are both ticked. In practice, other windows will be ticked too. Once selected, you can choose where you want to put the windows on the screen. I normally have them fairly near the logging line.

Check Partial and N + 1 windows
Check Partial and N + 1 windows

Entering a call-sign

This is where SCP and N+1 start becoming useful. Say we are entering a call-sign but we don’t have the full call. The screen-shots below demonstrate how ‘Check Partial’ and N+1 behave.

In the shot below, I have received the letters M4AF (bottom arrow). The Check Partial window (middle arrow) shows two exact hits in the SCP data base i.e. two call-signs in the database have an exact match on the sub-string. The N+1 window (top arrow) shows other similar calls. If I have the first letter incorrect, these are possible options for the correct call.

M4AF received and logged
M4AF received and logged

I have a feeling that there is another letter before the M, so I enter a question mark at the start of the logged call:

?M4AF
?M4AF logged

We see now a different set of options. The Check Partial window is showing a couple of likely calls. The N+1 shows all calls that are up to one letter different from the logged call – in this case KM4AF.

But I’m still not receiving this guy very well and I now this that I have the last letter incorrect. I put a question mark at the end of his call-sign in the logging line.

M4AF? logged
M4AF? logged

This now drives a different behaviour in the SCP and N+1 windows. We have told the logging software that we know there is a letter at the end of the call but we are unsure what it is. Actually I am still missing a letter at the start of the call, but I don’t realise it at this stage.

You can see that the entered call-sign string is only matched by one call-sign in the Check Partial wndow – this is looking like a likely outcome and the operator’s mind should now start confirming if this is the actual call being received.

But hang on a moment, I now think his call might be GM4UFF. I enter the call-sign into the logging line, however there is no match in the Check Partial window and N+1 shows that there is a similar call with one character difference.

GM4UFF logged
GM4UFF logged

I then carry out my golden rule: If the call-sign you are logging does NOT appear in the Check Partial (SCP) window then DOUBLE CHECK IT by listening carefully or ask him to confirm the call again!!!

I double check the received call by listening carefully (or by asking him for a repeat) and finally I log the call. In this final window, I believe I have now received the other guy’s call correctly.

 

Check Partial hit
Check Partial hit

Result! The call is logged correctly and it might even be a new multiplier. 

Note – the call-sign is the only call-sign in the Check Partial and N+1 windows – I have a high degree of confidence now.

(NB. If the logged call-sign is a sub-string of another valid call-sign, that other call will appear in the Check Partial window).

Golden Rule – If the call-sign you are logging does NOT appear in the Check Partial (SCP) window then DOUBLE CHECK IT by listening carefully or ask him to confirm the call!!!

 N1MM+ Check Log Function

N1MM+ has a similar feature. The SCP database can be downloaded from the Tools menu (option: Download and Install Latest Check Partial file).

Enable the ‘Check Log’ window from the N1MM+ ‘Window’ menu – select ‘Check’.

 

N1MM+ Check Log
N1MM+ Check Log